Home / 2018-19 Undergraduate Timetable

 

Fall 2018

HPS100H1: Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science (online)
Course instructor: Hakob Barseghyan (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)

This is an online introduction to the key issues in the history and philosophy of science. How do scientific theories and method change through time? Is there a universal and unchangeable method of science? What demarcates science from non-science? Can scientific theories provide true descriptions of the world? Is there scientific progress? What are the major worldviews in the history of science? The pre-recorded lectures are available online at any time.

Tutorial sessions are live at the portal. For more information: http://www.hps.utoronto.ca/undergraduate_courses.htm

HPS110H1: The Science of Human Nature
Course instructors: Marga Vicedo and Mark Solovey (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 2-4

Why do we do what we do? What factors play a role in shaping our personality? What biological and social elements help configure a person’s moral and emotional character? In this course, we examine landmark studies that shook standard beliefs about human nature in their time. We analyze those studies in their historical context and discuss their relevance to social, ethical, and policy debates. The studies may include research on mother love, obedience, conformity, bystander intervention in emergencies, deception, race and gender stereotypes.

HPS200H1: Science and Values
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures)
Mondays 2-4

An introduction to issues at the interface of science and society, including the reciprocal influence of science and social norms, the relation of science and religion, dissemination of scientific knowledge, science and policy. Issues may include: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Weapons; Genetic Engineering; The Human Genome Project; Climate Change.

HPS202H1: Technology in the Modern World
Course instructor: Rebecca Woods (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 10-12

A survey of technical change and its social implications from the Industrial Revolution to the present.

HPS203H1: Making Sense of Uncertainty
Course instructor: Chen-Pang Yeang (24 Lectures)
Wednesdays 10-12

This course examines issues of uncertainty in various contexts of science, technology, and society since the 19th century.  Topics may include randomized controlled trials, statistical identification of normal and pathological, biopolitics, philosophical interpretations of probability, Brownian motions, uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics, cybernetic mind, and chance in avant-garde arts.

HPS210H1: Scientific Revolutions I
Course instructor: Brian Baigrie (24 Lectures)
Day & Time: Tuesdays 12-2

Case studies in the history of science from antiquity to 1800, including the revolutionary work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Linnaeus, Lavoisier, and Herschel. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.

HPS250H1: Introductory Philosophy of Science
Course instructor: Hakob Barseghyan (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 12-2

This course introduces and explores central issues in the philosophy of science, including scientific inference and method, and explanation. Topics may include underdetermination, realism, and empiricism, and laws of nature.

HPS319H1: History of Medicine II
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 12-2

This course examines the development of medicine from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. It focuses on the historical development of western medicine in relation to societies, politics and culture and considers topics such as changing views of the body, the development of medical institutions such as hospitals, asylums and laboratories, the diversified world of healing and the place of visual and material culture in the production and dissemination of medical knowledge.

HPS326H1: History of Science and Religion
Course instructor: Yiftach Fehige (24 Lectures)
Tuesdays 10-12
From its origins in the Renaissance, modern science has developed in the context of European religious beliefs and institutions. Although cases of conflict like Galileo or the Monkey Trial are famous, more common are cases of scientists like Newton or Faraday whose religious convictions were crucial to their scientific success.

HPS390H1: History of Mathematics to 1700
Course instructor: Craig Fraser (36 Lectures)
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 9-10

A survey of ancient, medieval and early modern mathematics, with emphasis on historical issues.  (Offered in alternate years)

HPS450H1: Revolutions in Science (formerly HPS350H1)
Course instructor: Joseph Berkovitz (24 Seminars)|
Tuesdays 2-4

A detailed investigation into a highly celebrated and important philosophical idea concerning the development of scientific knowledge: the notion of scientific revolutions. We will consider the process of theory change, whether theory choice is rational, and whether theoretical terms, such as light and space preserve their meanings across revolutions. In addition to classic work by Kuhn, we shall consider approaches that were inspired by Kuhn’s work. In particular, we will consider the approaches of sociologists of scientific knowledge. The course is taught as a seminar in which the students play an active role in presenting and discussing the readings.

JHE353H1: History of Evolutionary Biology I
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 12-2

An examination of major ideas about biological evolution from the 18th century to the 1930’s and of their impact on scientific and social thought. Topics include the diversity of life and its classification, the adaptation of organisms to their environment, Wallace’s and Darwin’s views on evolution by natural selection, sexual selection, inheritance from Mendel to T.H. Morgan, eugenics, and the implications of evolution for religion, gender roles, and the organization of society.

Winter 2019

HPS110H1: The Science of Human Nature
Course instructors: Marga Vicedo and Mark Solovey (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 2-4

Why do we do what we do? What factors play a role in shaping our personality? What biological and social elements help configure a person’s moral and emotional character? In this course, we examine landmark studies that shook standard beliefs about human nature in their time. We analyze those studies in their historical context and discuss their relevance to social, ethical, and policy debates. The studies may include research on mother love, obedience, conformity, bystander intervention in emergencies, deception, race and gender stereotypes.

HPS120H1: How to Think About Science
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 2-4

This course addresses the nature of science and its importance to our understanding of ourselves. Questions include: What is a science? Is science objective? What is scientific reasoning? Has our conception of science changed through history? How does science shape our moral image? Does science reveal our natures as humans?

HPS200H1: Science and Values
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures)
Tuesdays 12-2

An introduction to issues at the interface of science and society, including the reciprocal influence of science and social norms, the relation of science and religion, dissemination of scientific knowledge, science and policy. Issues may include: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Weapons; Genetic Engineering; The Human Genome Project; Climate Change.

HPS211H1: Scientific Revolutions II
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures)
Tuesdays 12-2

Case studies in the history of science from 1800 to 2000, including Volta, Lyell, Darwin, Mendel, Einstein, Schrödinger, Watson, and Crick. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.

HPS222H1: Ideas in the History and Philosophy of Science
Course instructor: Alex Koo (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 2-4

The course focuses on the bearings that philosophical views had on science in different periods in history. We consider philosophical conceptions of space, time and matter; the influence of religious views on science; the influence of natural magic on the emergence of modern science; and the nature of scientific knowledge.

HPS250H1: Introductory Philosophy of Science
Course instructor: Mike Miller (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 11-1

This course introduces and explores central issues in the philosophy of science, including scientific inference and method, and explanation. Topics may include underdetermination, realism, and empiricism, and laws of nature.

HPS283H1: The Engineer in History
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 4-6

The emphasis in this course will be more on the history of engineers as workers, members of professional groups, and managers rather than engineering proper, although obviously engineering cannot be ignored when we talk about engineers’ work.  The aim of the course is to give an understanding of the heritage of engineers as participants in the economy and society.

HPS302H1: Topics in Philosophy of Science
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 12-2

This course can concern topics of special interest in the philosophy of science from Antiquity until present. Topics may include scientific change, rationality, method, evidence, progress, reduction, scientific laws, models, representation etc. The course may also focus on specific-time periods, fields of inquiry, individuals, scientific institutions, geographic locations, etc.

HPS316H1: Environment and Technology
Course instructor: Rebecca Woods (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Wednesdays 10-12

This course examines the intersection of technology and environment in the modern world. Whether simple or complex, whether designed for recreation, work, or warfare, our tools and how we use them filter our perceptions of, and engagements with, non-human nature. Emphasis is on case studies from 1800 to the present.

HPS318H1: History of Medicine I
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 10-12

This course explores how medicine was practiced, taught and theorized from ancient Greece to the early modern period. It focuses on the historical development of western medicine in relation to societies, politics and culture, and considers topics such as the creation of medical traditions, the tranmission and communication of medical knowledge, the pluralistic world of healers, the role of religion, magic and natural philosophy, the cultural meaning of disease, and the emergence of institutions such as the hospital.

HPS324H1: Natural Science and Social Issues
Course instructor: Yiftach Fehige (24 Lectures)
Tuesdays 10-12

Historical examination of the interactions of science (both as body of knowledge and as enterprise) with ideological, political and social issues. The impact of science; attacks on and critiques of scientific expertise as background to contemporary conflicts. Subjects may vary according to students interests. (offered irregularly)

HPS352H1: History of the Human Sciences
Course instructor: Mark Solovey (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays/Wednesdays 4-5

This course explores major developments and controversies in the human sciences: psychology, sociology, economics, political science, and anthropology. How have scientists in these areas explained human behavior? How have they described, evaluated, and tried to improve society? We examine these issues in their historical context and consider their contemporary relevance.

HPS391H1: History of Mathematics from 1700
Course instructor: TBA (36 Lectures)
Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays 10-11

A survey of the development of mathematics from 1700 to the present with emphasis on historical issues. (Offered in alternate years)

HPS401H1: Scientific Artifacts    New Course!
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures)
Thursdays 2-4

This course explores the history of science through direct engagement with local scientific artifacts within the University of Toronto Scientific Instrument Collection (UTSIC.org). Each student will undertake a research project focused on a single artifact within the collection in order to explore both the local history of science and the methodology of material culture research as it relates to science.

JHE353H1 History of Evolutionary Biology I
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 12-2

An examination of major ideas about biological evolution from the 18th century to the 1930’s and of their impact on scientific and social thought. Topics include the diversity of life and its classification, the adaptation of organisms to their environment, Wallace’s and Darwin’s views on evolution by natural selection, sexual selection, inheritance from Mendel to T.H. Morgan, eugenics, and the implications of evolution for religion, gender roles, and the organization of society.

 
 

Share This