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September 2017

G. McOuat, Cosmopolitan objects – reconstituting some things in the history and philosophy of science

September 6 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Old Victoria College Building, 2nd floor, Room VC215

Histories and Philosophies of Science have, thankfully, gone global. “Circulation” and “confluence” accounts of the growth and dissemination of knowledge are replacing one-directional origin and dissemination models. We now can speak of “multiple modernities”. This paper will examine the notion of “cosmopolitanism” as a recent development in the history and philosophy of science, and will offer a deeper engagement with what we might call “cosmopolitan things” – the kinds of objects that gather around them certain cosmopolitan possibilities.

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October 2017

G. Barker, Coming to Terms with the Organic: Emerging Perspectives for the Global Environmental Crisis (Event Postponed)

October 4 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Old Victoria College Building, 2nd floor, Room VC215

This event has been postponed due to illness. Discussions of climate change reveal a deep disconnect in our thinking about environmental issues in the human-dominated world of the 21st century. The language and conceptual tools shared by many climate scientists and policy-makers remain attached to a reductive mechanistic perspective that eschews talk of values, while those shared by many activists and practical experts have strong strains of a value-laden organicist holism. Both views are dangerously inadequate to guide effective and… Continue Reading G. Barker, Coming to Terms with the Organic: Emerging Perspectives for the Global Environmental Crisis (Event Postponed)

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November 2017

S. Hossenfelder, Lost in Math – How Beauty Misleads Physics

November 15 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Old Victoria College Building, 2nd floor, Room VC215

A good theory of nature should be "natural," according to theoretical physicists. In the foundations of physics, naturalness has obtained a mathematical definition and it has become one of the most important criteria for theory development. The criterion is working badly, but physicists continue to use it nevertheless. Why? In this talk, I will summarize the historical roots of naturalness and discuss its legacy.

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