Home / 2019-20 Undergraduate Timetable

 

For a list of building locations and names, please visit http://map.utoronto.ca/utsg/c/buildings.

Fall 2019

HPS100H1: Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science (online)
Course instructor: Hakob Barseghyan (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)

This is an online introduction to the key issues in the history and philosophy of science. How do scientific theories and method change through time? Is there a universal and unchangeable method of science? What demarcates science from non-science? Can scientific theories provide true descriptions of the world? Is there scientific progress? What are the major worldviews in the history of science? The pre-recorded lectures are available online at any time.

Tutorial sessions are live at the portal. For more information: http://www.hps.utoronto.ca/undergraduate_courses.htm

DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS110H1: The Science of Human Nature
Course instructors: Marga Vicedo and Mark Solovey (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Two Sections – LEC0101: Tuesdays 1-3, Location: Northrop Frye Hall, Room 003; LEC0201: Thursdays 1-3, Location: Northrop Frye Hall, Room 003

Why do we do what we do? What factors play a role in shaping our personality? What biological and social elements help configure a person’s moral and emotional character? In this course, we examine landmark studies that shook standard beliefs about human nature in their time. We analyze those studies in their historical context and discuss their relevance to social, ethical, and policy debates. The studies may include research on mother love, obedience, conformity, bystander intervention in emergencies, deception, race and gender stereotypes.

DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS120H1: How to Think About Science
Course instructor: Fermin Fulda(24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 1-3
Location: NF119 LOCATION CHANGE

This course addresses the nature of science and its importance to our understanding of ourselves. Questions include: What is a science? Is science objective? What is scientific reasoning? Has our conception of science changed through history? How does science shape our moral image? Does science reveal our natures as humans?

DR=HUM; BR=2

HPS202H1: Technology in the Modern World
Course instructor: Rebecca Woods (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 10-12
Location: Emmanuel College, Room 001

This course examines the reciprocal relationship between technology and society since 1800 from the perspectives of race, class, and gender. From the role of European imperial expansion in 19th-century industrialization and mechanization to the development of nuclear technology, smartphones, and digital computers in the 20th century, we consider cultural responses to new technologies, and the ways in which technology operates as an historical force in the history of the modern world.

Recommended preparation: HPS201H1;

DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS210H1: Scientific Revolutions I
Course instructor: Brian Baigrie (24 Lectures)
Mondays 10-12
Location: Alumni Hall, Room 400

Case studies in the history of science from antiquity to 1800, including the revolutionary work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Linnaeus, Lavoisier, and Herschel. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.

Exclusions: HPS200Y1

DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS250H1: Introductory Philosophy of Science
Course instructor: Hakob Barseghyan (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 11-1
Location: George Ignatieff Theatre

This course introduces and explores central issues in the philosophy of science, including scientific inference and method, and explanation. Topics may include underdetermination, realism, and empiricism, and laws of nature.

DR=HUM; BR=2

HPS272H1:Science against Religion? A Complex History (formerly HPS326H1)
Course instructor: Yiftach Fehige (24 Lectures) (New Course)
Wednesdays 10-12
Location: Emmanuel College, Room 001

This course introduces to the central topics arising from the encounter between modern science and religion. It aims to integrate historical and philosophical perspectives Did modern science arise because of Christianity or despite of it? Are science and religion necessarily in conflict? Have they factually always been in conflict throughout history? Are proofs of God’s existence  obsolete? Has science secularized society? What role should religions play in liberal democracies?

Exclusions: HPS326H1. DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS283H1: The Engineer in History (Engineering Course)
Course instructor: Jeni Barton (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 4-6
Location: GB 221

The emphasis in this course will be more on the history of engineers as workers, members of professional groups, and managers rather than engineering proper, although obviously engineering cannot be ignored when we talk about engineers’ work.  The aim of the course is to give an understanding of the heritage of engineers as participants in the economy and society.

HPS300H1:Topics in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology
Course instructor: Gary Graham (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 4-6
Location: Northrop Frye Hall, Room 006

This course focuses on some of the philosophical issues in quantum mechanics, and examines how those issues have contributed to the development of the theory, and especially to competing views of the ontological status of the wavefunction. We’ll avoid very technical features of the theory. No degree of expertise with the material is required, but the lectures and discussion will assume the ability to engage in philosophical debate that is appropriate for a 300 level course.

We will present each week’s topic in its historical, scientific and philosophical context, and follow up with a discussion.

Exclusion:HPS211H1

DR=HUM

HPS319H1: History of Medicine II
Course instructor: Lucia Dacome (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 12-2
Location: Victoria College, Room 323

This course examines the development of medicine from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. It focuses on the historical development of western medicine in relation to societies, politics and culture and considers topics such as changing views of the body, the development of medical institutions such as hospitals, asylums and laboratories, the diversified world of healing and the place of visual and material culture in the production and dissemination of medical knowledge.

Prerequisite: First-year students must have instructor’s approval

Exclusions: HPS314Y1, HPS315H1

DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS324H1: Natural Science & Social Issues
Course instructor: Yiftach Fehige (24 Lectures)
Thursdays 1-3
Location: Carr Hall (CR), Room 403 LOCATION CHANGE

Historical examination of the interactions of science (both as body of knowledge and as enterprise) with ideological, political and social issues. The impact of science; attacks on and critiques of scientific expertise as background to contemporary conflicts. Subjects may vary according to students’ interests.

DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS360H1: History of Modern Cosmology
Course instructor: Craig Fraser (24 Lectures)
Thursdays 12-2
Location: Victoria College, Room 212

Conceptions of the universe since 1800 with attention to observational sources of changing ideas. History of telescopes, stellar spectroscopy, and radio astronomy. Relativistic conceptions of space and time, models of stellar evolution, discovery of extra-galactic nebulae, Hubble red-shift and microwave background radiation. Philosophical and religious implications are examined.

DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS390H1: The Story of Number: Mathematics from the Babylonians to the Scientific Revolution (New Title)
Course instructor: Craig Fraser (36 Lectures)
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 9-10
Location: Brennan Hall, Room 200

A survey of ancient, medieval and early modern mathematics, with emphasis on historical issues.

Prerequisite: At least 1 FCE at the 200+ level from CSC/MAT/STA;

Exclusions: HPS 310Y1, MAT220Y1

DR=HUM/SCI; BR=3

HPS402H1: Beyond the Human, Beyond the West: Animals in Transnational Histories of Science and Technology (New Course)
Course instructor: Rebecca Woods (24 Seminars)
Tuesdays 2-4
Location: NF008 LOCATION CHANGE

Nonhuman animals are central to the production of scientific facts and artifacts. They also exhibit little innate respect for anthropogenic political boundaries, making their study an effective way into transnational histories of science and technology. This advanced seminar will revisit classic themes in the history of science and technology—the rise of the laboratory; the development of natural history; experimental systems; categories of race, gender, and sex—from the perspective of nonhuman animals. Doing so will allow us to examine what technoscientific practice looks like when mice, monkeys, and Drosophilaflies take center stage; andto bring nonwestern species, knowledges, practices, and places into existing narratives about the history of science and technology in the “West.”

Prerequisite: Any 300-level HPS course or permission of the instructor

DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS450H1: Revolutions in Science (formerly HPS350H1)
Course instructor: Denis Walsh (24 Seminars)
Mondays 2-4
Location: Victoria College, Room 211

A detailed investigation into a highly celebrated and important philosophical idea concerning the development of scientific knowledge: the notion of scientific revolutions. We will consider the process of theory change, whether theory choice is rational, and whether theoretical terms, such as light and space preserve their meanings across revolutions. In addition to classic work by Kuhn, we shall consider approaches that were inspired by Kuhn’s work. In particular, we will consider the approaches of sociologists of scientific knowledge. The course is taught as a seminar in which the students play an active role in presenting and discussing the readings.

Prerequisite: HPS250H1 or permission of the instructor; Exclusions: HPS350H1

DR=HUM; BR=3

Winter 2020

HPS120H1: How to Think About Science
Course instructor: Denis Walsh (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 2-4
Location: Alumni Hall, 100

This course addresses the nature of science and its importance to our understanding of ourselves. Questions include: What is a science? Is science objective? What is scientific reasoning? Has our conception of science changed through history? How does science shape our moral image? Does science reveal our natures as humans?

DR=HUM; BR=2

HPS200H1: Science and Values
Course instructor: Yiftach Fehige (24 Lectures)
Wednesdays 10-12
Location: Medical Sciences Building, Room 2158

An introduction to issues at the interface  of science and society, including the reciprocal influence of science and social norms, the relation of science and religion, dissemination of scientific knowledge, science and policy. Issues may include: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Weapons; Genetic Engineering; The Human Genome Project; Climate Change.

DR=HUM; BR=3

 

HPS211H1: Scientific Revolutions II
Course instructor: Brian Baigrie (24 Lectures)
Mondays 11-1
Location: George Ignatieff Theatre

Case studies in the history of science from 1800 to 2000, including Volta, Lyell, Darwin, Mendel, Einstein, Schrödinger, Watson, and Crick. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.

Here is a link to the full course syllabus.

Exclusions: HPS300Y0

DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS222H1: Science, Paradoxes, and Knowledge
Course instructor: Joseph Berkovitz (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 2-4
Location: Emmanuel College, Room 001

What is the nature of science and scientific knowledge? What is the nature of space, time and motion? Does science tell us the truth about the world? What are scientific revolutions and how they occur? The course will address these and various other questions about science. It will focus on the bearings that philosophical views had on science in different periods in history, starting from ancient Greece and concluding in the 20thC.

DR=HUM; BR=2

HPS240H1: The Influence of the Eugenics Movement on Contemporary Society (New Course)
Course instructor: Elizabeth Koester (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 4-6
Location: Victoria College, Room 323

This course explores present-day topics such as reproductive issues (including “designer babies” and genetic counselling), gender, racism/colonialism, disability and euthanasia through the lens of the history of eugenics.  A “scientific” movement which became popular around the world in the early twentieth century, eugenics was based on the principle that certain undesirable human characteristics were hereditary and could be eliminated by controlled reproduction.  It resulted in the enactment of laws in numerous places, including Canada, authorizing coerced reproductive sterilization of certain individuals, and other measures intended to “improve” humanity. Today, we see its influences woven through contemporary debates, a number of which we will consider.

DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS260H1: Biology & the Future: Science & Science Fiction
Course instructor: Nikolai Krementsov (24 Lectures)
Tuesdays 2-4
Location: Victoria College, Room 323

This lecture course explores the fantastic visions of humanity’s future inspired by the advance of the biological sciences during the twentieth century. Biology provided the scientific underpinning for societal hopes and fears embodied in such cultural icons as robots, aliens, “brains in a vat,” and super-humans.

Exclusions: HMB444H1

DR=HUM; BR=1

HPS 300H1S: Topics in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology: Quantifying the World: the debates on the ethical and epistemic implications of AI and automation
Course instructor: Roberta Buiani
Mondays 10-12
Location: Gerald Larkin Building, Room 341
We are told that automation and artificial intelligence are shaping our future. The effects of automation, computing, and information technology have been affecting our socio-technical environment for a long time. These transformations have occurred both at the material and at the epistemological level, by the rise of automation and computing on the one hand, and an almost cult-like trust in mechanization. This course will examine the gradual technico-epistemological and ethical debates that AI and automation have produced in all sectors of society: it will consider a variety of media and instruments from data visualization and mapping, to the use of AI and robotics, contextualizing them within popular and amply-debated examples in the military field and in cybersecurity, in medical diagnostics and epidemiology, in the automotive industry, and in the personal realm.

HPS 301H1S: Topics in the History of Science: Modifying and Optimizing Life: on the peculiar alliance between AI, biology and engineering
Course instructor: Roberta Buiani
Mondays 2-4
Location: Northrop Frye Hall, Room 113

We are in the middle of a complicated debate involving the relation between information and biology. Taking cue from the entanglements that historically have pervaded the relation between biology and information technology since the early Twentieth Century, this course interrogates the sociocultural and technological conjuncture that has brought computer science, biology and engineering together into peculiar, ingenious, and often controversial alliances. What do AI, synthetic biology and molecular engineering have in common? How have they come to be associated? What are the debates and ethics emerging from such associations? This course will combine theoretical texts as well as specific case studies and controversies currently under discussion. In particular, the course will focus on topics such as: geoengineering and bioremediation; GMO and Robotic insects; the use of expert systems and machine learning to optimize synthetic biology; the flourishing and marketing of precision and personalized medicine/immunotherapy; and the ethics behind CRISPR babies.

HPS316H1: Environment, Technology and Nature
Course instructor: Rebecca Woods (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 12-2
Location: Victoria College, Room 212

This course examines the intersection of technology and environment in the modern world. Whether simple or complex, whether designed for recreation, work, or warfare, our tools and how we use them filter our perceptions of, and engagements with, non-human nature. Emphasis is on case studies from 1800 to the present.

DR=HUM/SCI; BR=1

HPS318H1: History of Medicine I
Course instructor: Lucia Dacome(24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 12-2
Location: Victoria College, Room 323

This course explores how medicine was practiced, taught and theorized from ancient Greece to the early modern period. It focuses on the historical development of western medicine in relation to societies, politics and culture, and considers topics such as the creation of medical traditions, the transmission and communication of medical knowledge, the pluralistic world of healers, the role of religion, magic and natural philosophy, the cultural meaning of disease, and the emergence of institutions such as the hospital.

Prerequisite: First-year students must have instructor’s approval

Exclusions: HPS314Y1

DR=HUM; BR=3

JHE353H1: History of Evolutionary Biology I
Course instructor: Juan Ilerbaig(24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 2-4
Location: Ramsey Wright, Room 110

An examination of major ideas about biological evolution from the 18th century to the 1930’s and of their impact on scientific and social thought. Topics include the diversity of life and its classification, the adaptation of organisms to their environment, Wallace’s and Darwin’s views on evolution by natural selection, sexual selection, inheritance from Mendel to T.H. Morgan, eugenics, and the implications of evolution for religion, gender roles, and the organization of society.

Prerequisite: 6 full courses or equivalent; Exclusions: EEB353H1, HPS323H1, HPS353H

DR=HUM/SCI; BR=3

HPS391H1: Rebels who Count: The History of Mathematics from 1700 to the present (New Title)
Course instructor: Sylvia Nickerson (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 10-1
Lecture Location: BT101; Practicum Location: BR200 (Updated Location)

A survey of the development of mathematics from 1700 to the present with emphasis on historical issues.

Prerequisite: At least 1 FCE at the 200+ level from CSC/MAT/STA;

Exclusions: HPS310Y1, MAT220Y1, MAT391H1

DR=HUM/SCI; BR=3

HPS401H1: Scientific Artifacts

Course instructor: Erich Weidenhammer (24 Seminars, 12 Tutorials)
Thursdays 4-6
Location: Teefy Hall, Room 101

This course explores the history of science through direct engagement with local scientific artifacts within the University of Toronto Scientific Instrument Collection (UTSIC.org). Each student will undertake a research project focused on a single artifact within the collection in order to explore both the local history of science and the methodology of material culture research as it relates to science.

DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS440H1: Health, Medicine, and Society: Stories and Histories(formerly HPS303H1)
Course instructor: Lucia Dacome (24 Seminars)
Thursdays 10-12
Location: RL 14190 (Updated Location)

This course offers a focused discussion of several aspects of the history of medicine. Various themes are examined in depth year to year so as to familiarize students with different topics and methodological approaches.

Prerequisite: HPS318H and/or HPS319H, or at least 1.0 FCE of HPS courses at the 200-level or higher; with a focus on the history of science

Exclusions: HPS303H1

DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS498H1: Digital Humanities in History and Philosophy of Science
Course instructor: Hakob Barseghyan
Thursdays 2-5
Location: Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, Room 348

This course examines how digital technologies transform the way historians and philosophers of science conduct research and present their work. It combines traditional reading assignments with hands-on collaborative application of computational tools and methodologies to the history and philosophy of science. The students will apply and critically evaluate diverse digital techniques such as data extraction, semantic text analysis, belief visualization, and epistemic network analysis.

Prerequisite: Two HPS courses

DR=HUM