Home / 2020-21 Undergraduate Timetable

 

For further information about mode of delivery, please see the Faculty of Arts & Science website.

Fall 2020

HPS100H1: Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science
Day & Time: Thursdays 10:00 am – 12:00 noon
Course instructor: Cory Lewis (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
An investigation of some pivotal periods in the history of science with an emphasis on the influences of philosophy on the scientists of the period, and the philosophical and social implications of the scientific knowledge, theory and methodology that emerged.
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS110H1: The Science of Human Nature
Section 1 – Day & Time: Tuesdays 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Section 2 – Day & Time: Thursdays 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Course instructors: Marga Vicedo and Mark Solovey (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Why do we do what we do? What factors play a role in shaping our personality? What biological and social elements help configure a person’s moral and emotional character? In this course, we examine landmark studies that shook standard beliefs about human nature in their time. We analyze those studies in their historical context and discuss their relevance to social, ethical, and policy debates. The studies may include research on mother love, obedience, conformity, bystander intervention in emergencies, deception, race and gender stereotypes.
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS120H1: How to Think About Science
Day & Time: Tuesdays 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Course instructor: Fermin Fulda (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This course addresses the nature of science and its importance to our understanding of ourselves. Questions include: What is a science? Is science objective? What is scientific reasoning? Has our conception of science changed through history? How does science shape our moral image? Does science reveal our natures as humans?
DR=HUM; BR=2

HPS200H1: Science and Values
Day & Time: Wednesdays 10:00 am – 12:00 noon
Course instructor: Cory Lewis (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
An introduction to issues at the interface of science and society, including the reciprocal influence of science and social norms, the relation of science and religion, dissemination of scientific knowledge, science and policy. Issues may include: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Weapons; Genetic Engineering; The Human Genome Project; Climate Change.
DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS210H1: Scientific Revolutions I
Day & Time: Mondays 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Course instructor: Brian Baigrie (24 Lectures)
Case studies in the history of science from antiquity to 1800, including the revolutionary work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Linnaeus, Lavoisier, and Herschel. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.
Exclusions: HPS200Y1
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS222H1: Science, Paradoxes, and Knowledge
Day & Time: Tuesdays 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Course instructor: Joseph Berkovitz (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
What is the nature of science and scientific knowledge? What is the nature of space, time and motion? Does science tell us the truth about the world? What are scientific revolutions and how they occur? The course will address these and various other questions about science. It will focus on the bearings that philosophical views had on science in different periods in history, starting from ancient Greece and concluding in the 20th C.
DR=HUM; BR=2

HPS250H1: Introductory Philosophy of Science
Day & Time: Thursdays 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Course instructor: Jamie Shaw (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This course introduces and explores central issues in the philosophy of science, including scientific inference and method, and explanation. Topics may include underdetermination, realism, and empiricism, and laws of nature.
DR=HUM; BR=2

HPS255H1: History and Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence (New Course)
Day & Time: Tuesdays 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Course Instructor: Karina Vold (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This course introduces students to the historical and philosophical issues around artificial intelligence (AI). We will cover the geopolitical, economic, and cultural contexts from which the field of AI emerged, as well as the troubled history of the scientific concept of intelligence and how that has influenced the development of AI. The course will also introduce students to foundational and normative questions, such as how we should define and measure AI, how to evaluate the accomplishments of AI systems, and what the benefits and risks of relying on such systems might be.
DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS301H1: Topics in the History of Science: Medicine and Public Health in the Middle East (New Course)
Day & Time: Tuesdays 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Course instructor: Elise Burton (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This survey course provides a broad thematic overview of the history of medicine and public health in the Middle East and North Africa. Focusing on the early modern and modern periods, the course lectures and readings highlight the region as a contact zone of medical traditions and a key site in the emergence of colonial medicine and international public health. Rather than counterposing “Western” medicine against an Islamic or Arabic medicine, we will investigate the shared transformations and continuities of medical history that defy easy categorization. Together, we will trace the circulation of medical practitioners, educators, texts, instruments, treatments, and patients across the Mediterranean Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Sahara Desert. Meanwhile, we will examine the social and cultural effects of new developments in medical thought and practice, including ideas about contagion and disease prevention, the notion of public health and hygiene, and the construction of colonial and postcolonial medical schools and hospitals. Of special concern will be the relationships between patients and different kinds of medical practitioners and scientists, and the elements of gender, race, and class that structure these relationships. By the end of the course, you will be able to appreciate a range of scholarly problems in Eurocentric histories of science and medicine; the broader political implications of excluding non-Western regions from this history; and the roots of contemporary issues facing healthcare provision in the Middle East.
DR=HUM; BR=1

HPS304H1: A History Lab: Biomedical Sciences, Past and Present
Day & Time: Tuesdays 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Course instructor: Marga Vicedo (36 Seminars)
Offers a hands-on introduction to historical research. Through a close examination of classic scholarly texts, archival materials, and recent media publications, this advanced seminar explores the sources, methods, and approaches in historical studies of biomedical twentieth century-sciences.
DR=HUM; BR=1

HPS318H1: History of Medicine I
Day & Time: Tuesdays 12:00 noon – 2:00 pm
Course instructor: Lucia Dacome (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This course explores how medicine was practiced, taught and theorized from ancient Greece to the early modern period. It focuses on the historical development of western medicine in relation to societies, politics and culture, and considers topics such as the creation of medical traditions, the tranmission and communication of medical knowledge, the pluralistic world of healers, the role of religion, magic and natural philosophy, the cultural meaning of disease, and the emergence of institutions such as the hospital.
Prerequisite: First-year students must have instructor’s approval
Exclusions: HPS314Y1
DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS345H1: Quantifying the World: on the ethical and epistemic implications of AI and automation (New Course)
Day & Time: Mondays 10:00 am – 12:00 noon
Course instructor: Roberta Buiani (24 Lectures)
The effects of automation, computing, and information technology have had a great impact on our society.  The rise of automation and computing the almost cult-like trust in mechanization have transformed our society both at the material and the epistemological level. This course will examine the epistemological and ethical debates that AI and automation have produced in all sectors of society. It will consider a variety of media and instruments from data visualization and mapping, to the use of AI and robotics, contextualizing them within popular and hotly contested examples in the military field and in cybersecurity, in medical diagnostics and epidemiology, in the automotive industry, and in the personal realm.
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=3

JHE353H1 History of Evolutionary Biology I
Day & Time: Thursdays 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Course instructor: Juan Ilerbaig (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
An examination of major ideas about biological evolution from the 18th century to the 1930’s and of their impact on scientific and social thought. Topics include the diversity of life and its classification, the adaptation of organisms to their environment, Wallace’s and Darwin’s views on evolution by natural selection, sexual selection, inheritance from Mendel to T.H. Morgan, eugenics, and the implications of evolution for religion, gender roles, and the organization of society.
Prerequisite: 6 full courses or equivalent
Exclusions: EEB353H1, HPS323H1, HPS353H1
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=3

HPS/MAT390H1: The Story of Number: Mathematics from the Babylonians to the Scientific Revolution
Days and Times: Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Course instructor: Craig Fraser (36 Lectures)
The course is devoted to topics in ancient, medieval and early modern mathematics and exact science, approached through an examination of selected major texts from 1800 B.C. to the end of the seventeenth century. Subjects that will be examined include Old Babylonian mathematics, Euclidean geometry, Archimedes, Ptolemy’s astronomy and trigonometry, Islamic algebra and geometry, Medieval European mathematics, Cardano and the solution of the cubic equation, origins of probability and statistics, tangent and area problems in the seventeenth century, calculus, and Newton and Leibniz.
Prerequisite: At least 1 FCE at the 200+ level from CSC/MAT/STA
Exclusions: HPS310Y1, MAT220Y1, MAT390H1; DR=HUM/SCI; BR=3

HPS450H1: Revolutions in Science (formerly HPS350H1)
Day & Time: Thursdays 12:00 noon – 2:00 pm
Course instructor: Denis Walsh (24 Seminars)
A detailed investigation into a highly celebrated and important philosophical idea concerning the development of scientific knowledge: the notion of scientific revolutions. We will consider the process of theory change, whether theory choice is rational, and whether theoretical terms, such as light and space preserve their meanings across revolutions. In addition to classic work by Kuhn, we shall consider approaches that were inspired by Kuhn’s work. In particular, we will consider the approaches of sociologists of scientific knowledge. The course is taught as a seminar in which the students play an active role in presenting and discussing the readings.
Prerequisite: HPS250H1 or permission of the instructor
Exclusions: HPS350H1
DR=HUM; BR=3

Winter 2021

HPS100H1: Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science
Day & Time: Thursdays 10:00 am – 12:00 noon
Course instructor: Cory Lewis (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
An investigation of some pivotal periods in the history of science with an emphasis on the influences of philosophy on the scientists of the period, and the philosophical and social implications of the scientific knowledge, theory and methodology that emerged.
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS120H1: How to Think About Science
Day & Time: Mondays 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Course instructor: Denis Walsh (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This course addresses the nature of science and its importance to our understanding of ourselves. Questions include: What is a science? Is science objective? What is scientific reasoning? Has our conception of science changed through history? How does science shape our moral image? Does science reveal our natures as humans?
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS200H1: Science and Values
Day & Time: Wednesdays 10:00 am – 12:00 noon
Course instructor: Cory Lewis (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
An introduction to issues at the interface of science and society, including the reciprocal influence of science and social norms, the relation of science and religion, dissemination of scientific knowledge, science and policy. Issues may include: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Weapons; Genetic Engineering; The Human Genome Project; Climate Change.
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS211H1: Scientific Revolutions II
Day & Time: Mondays 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Course instructor: Brian Baigrie (24 Lectures)
Case studies in the history of science from 1800 to 2000, including Volta, Lyell, Darwin, Mendel, Einstein, Schrödinger, Watson, and Crick. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.
Exclusions: HPS200Y1, HPS300Y0
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=2

HPS240H1: The Influence of the Eugenics Movement on Contemporary Society
Day & Time: Tuesdays 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Course instructor: Elizabeth Koester (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This course explores present-day topics such as reproductive issues (including “designer babies” and genetic counselling), gender, racism/colonialism, disability and euthanasia through the lens of the history of eugenics.  A “scientific” movement which became popular around the world in the early twentieth century, eugenics was based on the principle that certain undesirable human characteristics were hereditary and could be eliminated by controlled reproduction.  It resulted in the enactment of laws in numerous places, including Canada, authorizing coerced reproductive sterilization of certain individuals, and other measures intended to “improve” humanity. Today, we see its influences woven through contemporary debates, a number of which we will consider.
DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS250H1: Introductory Philosophy of Science
Day & Time: Thursdays 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Course instructor: Jamie Shaw (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This course introduces and explores central issues in the philosophy of science, including scientific inference and method, and explanation. Topics may include underdetermination, realism, and empiricism, and laws of nature.
DR=HUM; BR=2

HPS260H1: Biology & the Future: Science & Science Fiction
Day & Time: Thursdays 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Course instructor: Nikolai Krementsov (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This lecture course explores the fantastic visions of humanity’s future inspired by the advance of the biological sciences during the twentieth century. Biology provided the scientific underpinning for societal hopes and fears embodied in such cultural icons as robots, aliens, “brains in a vat,” and super-humans.
Exclusions: HMB444H1
DR=HUM; BR=1

HPS283H1: The Engineer in History (Engineering Course)
Day & Time: Thursdays 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Course instructor: Bree Lohman (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
The emphasis in this course will be more on the history of engineers as workers, members of professional groups, and managers rather than engineering proper, although obviously engineering cannot be ignored when we talk about engineers’ work.  The aim of the course is to give an understanding of the heritage of engineers as participants in the economy and society.

HPS300H1 Topics in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology: The Limits of Machine Intelligence (New Course)
Day & Time: Tuesdays 10:00 am – 12:00 noon
Course instructor: Karina Vold (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
At a time when headline-making AI breakthroughs are an almost daily occurrence, it might seem that we are on the cusp of living with artificial systems that match or exceed human intelligence. But there are longstanding philosophical challenges around the definition of intelligence, how we measure it, and what machines could really be capable of, that still need addressing. For example, could a machine ever be conscious, or creative, or have common-sense? How close are we to building human-level AI? What do we need to get us there? This course aims to explore these questions in greater depth.
Exclusion: HPS211H1
DR=HUM; BR= NONE

HPS346H1: Modifying and Optimizing Life: on the peculiar alliance between AI, biology, and engineering (New Course)
Day & Time: Mondays 10:00 am – 12:00 noon
Course instructor: Roberta Buiani (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Taking cue from the entanglements that historically have pervaded the relation between biology and information technology since the early 20C century, this course interrogates the sociocultural and technological conjuncture that has brought computer science, biology and engineering together into peculiar, ingenious, and often controversial alliances. What do AI, synthetic biology, and biotechnology have in common? How have they come to be associated? What are the debates and ethics emerging from such associations? The course will focus on topics such as: geoengineering and bioremediation; GMO and Robotic insects; the use of expert systems and machine learning to optimize synthetic biology; the flourishing and marketing of precision and personalized medicine/immunotherapy; and the ethics behind CRISPR babies.
DR=HUM; BR=3

HPS351H1: Life Sciences and Society (New Course)
Day & time: Mondays/Wednesdays 10:00 am – 11:00 am
Course instructor: Elise Burton (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
This course examines how the contemporary life sciences intersect with global geopolitics through an introduction to the field of science and technology studies (STS). Using interdisciplinary methodologies and global perspectives, the course addresses key questions including: Who benefits from the development of new biotechnologies, and who is exploited in the process? Who sets the international norms of bioethics and medical market regulation? How are biologists and medical practitioners redefining life for different societies and their diverse constituencies? The course predominantly focuses on humans, but also introduces new scholarship on animal studies and synthetic life forms. Ithas significant coverage of the Middle East, Africa, and East and South Asia.
DR=HUM; BR=3

JHE353H1 History of Evolutionary Biology I
Day & Time: Thursdays 12:00 noon – 2:00 pm
Course instructor: Juan Ilerbaig (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
An examination of major ideas about biological evolution from the 18th century to the 1930’s and of their impact on scientific and social thought. Topics include the diversity of life and its classification, the adaptation of organisms to their environment, Wallace’s and Darwin’s views on evolution by natural selection, sexual selection, inheritance from Mendel to T.H. Morgan, eugenics, and the implications of evolution for religion, gender roles, and the organization of society
Prerequisite: 6 full courses or equivalent
Exclusions: EEB353H1, HPS323H1, HPS353H1
DR=HUM/SCI; BR=3

HPS370H1: Philosophy of Medicine (New Course)
Day & Time: Tuesdays 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Course instructor: Mathew Mercuri (12 Lectures)
This course introduces students to philosophical issues in the study of medicine. The course will cover foundational questions, such as what constitutes evidence that a therapy is effective, how do we define health and disease, and information derived from research is used to support clinical practice. Students will be introduced to different movements in contemporary clinical medicine, such as Evidence-based Medicine, Person-Centered Healthcare, and Precision Medicine.
Recommended preparation: HPS250H1
DR=HUM; BR=3

*HPS/MAT391H1: Rebels who Count: The History of Mathematics from 1700 to the present
Day & Time: Lecture – Thursdays 10 am – 12 noon; Practical – Thursdays 12 noon – 1pm
Course instructor: Sylvia Nickerson (24 Lectures, 10 Practicals)
A survey of the development of mathematics from 1700 to the present with emphasis on historical issues.
Prerequisite: At least 1 FCE at the 200+ level from CSC/MAT/STA
Exclusions: HPS310Y1, MAT220Y1, MAT391H1; DR=HUM/SCI; BR=3

HPS440H1: Health, Medicine, and Society: Sciences of Whiteness in the Middle East and its Diasporas (formerly HPS303H1)
Day & Time: Mondays 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Course instructor: Elise Burton (24 Seminars)
DR=HUM; BR=3