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Fall 2021

HPS100H1: Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science and Technology
Course instructor: Karina Vold (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 9-11
Delivery Method: TBA
An investigation of some pivotal periods in the history of science with an emphasis on the influences of philosophy on the scientists of the period, and the philosophical and social implications of the scientific knowledge, theory and methodology that emerged.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS110H1: The Science of Human Nature
Course instructors: Marga Vicedo and Mark Solovey (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Section 1 – Thursdays 12-2
Section 2 – Fridays 12-2
Delivery Method: TBA
Why do we do what we do? What factors play a role in shaping our personality? What biological and social elements help configure a person’s moral and emotional character? In this course, we examine landmark studies that shook standard beliefs about human nature in their time. We analyze those studies in their historical context and discuss their relevance to social, ethical, and policy debates. The studies may include research on mother love, obedience, conformity, bystander intervention in emergencies, deception, race and gender stereotypes.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS120H1: How to Think About Science
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 2-4
Delivery Method: TBA
This course addresses the nature of science and its importance to our understanding of ourselves. Questions include: What is a science? Is science objective? What is scientific reasoning? Has our conception of science changed through history? How does science shape our moral image? Does science reveal our natures as humans?
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS200H1: Science and Values
Course instructor: Yiftach Fehige (24 Lectures, Tutorials)
Tuesdays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
An introduction to issues at the interface of science and society, including the reciprocal influence of science and social norms, the relation of science and religion, dissemination of scientific knowledge, science and policy. Issues may include: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Weapons; Genetic Engineering; The Human Genome Project; Climate Change.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS202H1: Technology in the Modern World
Course instructor: Adrien Zakar (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 2-4
Delivery Method: TBA
This course examines the reciprocal relationship between technology and society since 1800 from the perspectives of race, class, and gender. From the role of European imperial expansion in 19th-century industrialization and mechanization to the development of nuclear technology, smartphones, and digital computers in the 20th century, we consider cultural responses to new technologies, and the ways in which technology operates as an historical force in the history of the modern world.
Recommended Preparation: HPS201H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS203H1: Making Sense of Uncertainty
Course instructor: Chen-Pang Yeang (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
This course examines issues of uncertainty in various contexts of science, technology, and society since the 19th century. Topics may include randomized controlled trials, statistical identification of normal and pathological, biopolitics, philosophical interpretations of probability, Brownian motions, uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics, cybernetic mind, and chance in avant-garde arts.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS206H1: Science and State: Science and Forming of Modern Nations
Course instructor: Wen-Ching Sung (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials) (New Course)
Mondays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
In this course, we will learn about the complicated relations between science and state in the modern world.  The state is often the main patronage to scientists.  Science and technology have played crucial parts in political, economic, social, and cultural development. For poor countries, science has been a solution to catch up with rich countries.  Yet the risk of science and technologies often unequally falls on the developing world.  Drawing from anthropological, social, and historical studies of science, we will examine, among other topics, science and nation-building from ethnicity, population control, internet, big data, technocracy, scientists’ self-fashioning and global capitalism.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS210H1: Scientific Revolutions I
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures)
Fridays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
Case studies in the history of science from antiquity to 1800, including the revolutionary work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Linnaeus, Lavoisier, and Herschel. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.
Exclusion: HPS200Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS250H1: Introductory Philosophy of Science
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 12-2
Delivery Method: TBA
This course introduces and explores central issues in the philosophy of science, including scientific inference and method, and explanation. Topics may include underdetermination, realism, and empiricism, and laws of nature.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS272H1: Science against Religion? A Complex History (formerly HPS326H1)
Course instructor: Yiftach Fehige (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
This course introduces to the central topics arising from the encounter between modern science and religion. It aims to integrate historical and philosophical perspectives Did modern science arise because of Christianity or despite of it? Are science and religion necessarily in conflict? Have they factually always been in conflict throughout history? Are proofs of God’s existence obsolete? Has science secularized society? What role should religions play in liberal democracies?
Exclusions: HPS326H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS300H1: Topics in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology: The Limits of Machine Intelligence
Course instructor: Karina Vold (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 2-4
Delivery Method: TBA
What are the limits of machine intelligence? This course examines some of the longstanding philosophical challenges around the definition of intelligence, how we measure it, and what machines could really be capable of. Questions include: Could a machine ever be conscious, or creative, or have common-sense? What do AI researchers and developers mean by “intelligence” and how does this compare to how the term is used in other branches of cognitive science? How close are we to building human-level AI and what do we need to get us there?Exclusion: HPS211H1
Distribution Requirement Status:
 This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

HPS319H1: History of Medicine II
Course instructor: Lucia Dacome (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 12-2
Delivery Method: TBA
This course examines the development of medicine from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. It focuses on the historical development of medicine in relation to societies, politics and culture and considers topics such as changing views of the body, the development of medical institutions such as hospitals, asylums and laboratories, the diversified world of healing and the place of visual and material culture in the production and dissemination of medical knowledge.
Prerequisite: First year students must have instructors approval
Exclusion: HPS314Y1; HPS315H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS321H1: Understanding Engineering Practice: From Design to Entrepreneurship
Course instructor: Chen-Pang Yeang (24 Seminars, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
This course seeks to understand the nature of engineering practice, which comprises complex social, intellectual, and technical actions at various stages from design to entrepreneurship. Building upon the history and social studies of technology, philosophy of engineering, business history, and management science, we introduce ways to analyze such complex actions.
Prerequisite: Three courses with any combination of engineering, natural sciences, medical sciences, or commerce
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS322H1: Complexity, Order, and Emergence
Course instructor: TBA (24 Seminars, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 12-2
Delivery Method: TBA
A survey of the history of and recent developments in the scientific study of complex systems and emergent order. There will be particular emphasis on the biological and cognitive sciences. Topics covered may include: mechanism and teleology in the history of science, 19th and 20th century emergentism, complex systems dynamics, order and adaptiveness, self-organisation in biology and congitive development.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS345H1: Quantifying the World: on the ethical and epistemic implications of AI and automation
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures)
Mondays 2-4
Delivery Method: TBA
The effects of automation, computing, and information technology have had a great impact on our society.  The rise of automation and computing the almost cult-like trust in mechanization have transformed our society both at the material and the epistemological level. This course will examine the epistemological and ethical debates that AI and automation have produced in all sectors of society. It will consider a variety of media and instruments from data visualization and mapping, to the use of AI and robotics, contextualizing them within popular and hotly contested examples in the military field and in cybersecurity, in medical diagnostics and epidemiology, in the automotive industry, and in the personal realm.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS354H1: History of Medicine and Public Health in the Middle East
Course instructor: Elise Burton (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
(New Course)
Mondays 1-3
Delivery Method: TBA
This course provides a broad thematic overview of the history of medicine and public health in the Middle East. Focusing on the modern period, the course highlights the region as a contact zone of medical traditions and a key site in the emergence of colonial medicine and international public health. Students examine the social and cultural effects of new developments in medical thought and practice, including ideas about contagion and disease prevention; the notion of public health and hygiene; eugenics and forensic medicine; and the construction of colonial and postcolonial medical schools and hospitals.
Prerequisites: A minimum of 4.0 course credit or instructor’s approval
Recommended Preparation:
 A prior course in HPS, History, or NMC
Distribution Requirement Status:
 Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

HPS/MAT390H1: The Story of Number: Mathematics from the Babylonians to the Scientific Revolution
Course instructor: TBA (36 Lectures)
Fridays 10-1
Delivery Method: TBA
A survey of ancient, medieval and early modern mathematics, with emphasis on historical issues.
Prerequisite: At least one full course equivalent at the 200+level from CSC/MAT/STA
Exclusion: HPS310Y1; MAT220Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS450H1: Revolution in Science
Course instructor: Cory Lewis (24 Seminars)
Thursdays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
A detailed investigation into a highly celebrated and important philosophical idea concerning the development of scientific knowledge: the notion of scientific revolutions. We will consider the process of theory change, whether theory choice is rational, and whether theoretical terms, such as light and space preserve their meanings across revolutions. In addition to classic work by Kuhn, we shall consider approaches that were inspired by Kuhn’s work. In particular, we will consider the approaches of sociologists of scientific knowledge. The course is taught as a seminar in which the students play an active role in presenting and discussing the readings.
Prerequisite: HPS250H1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

Winter 2022

HPS100H1: Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science and Technology
Course instructor: Cory Lewis (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 9-11
Delivery Method: TBA
An investigation of some pivotal periods in the history of science with an emphasis on the influences of philosophy on the scientists of the period, and the philosophical and social implications of the scientific knowledge, theory and methodology that emerged.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS120H1: How to Think About Science
Course instructor: Denis Walsh (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 1-3
Delivery Method: TBA
This course addresses the nature of science and its importance to our understanding of ourselves. Questions include: What is a science? Is science objective? What is scientific reasoning? Has our conception of science changed through history? How does science shape our moral image? Does science reveal our natures as humans?
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS200H1: Science and Values
Course instructor: Cory Lewis (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 11-1
Delivery Method: TBA
An introduction to issues at the interface of science and society, including the reciprocal influence of science and social norms, the relation of science and religion, dissemination of scientific knowledge, science and policy. Issues may include: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Weapons; Genetic Engineering; The Human Genome Project; Climate Change.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS205H1: Science, Technology, and Empire
Course instructor: Elise Burton (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials) (New Course)
Mondays 2-4
Delivery Method: TBA
This gateway course introduces the emergence of the modern science and technology and the rise of European mercantile and colonial empires as closely intertwined processes. Beginning with the European discovery of the Americas, this course provides a broad thematic overview of the transformation of scientific practices in imperial contexts, including but not limited to geography and cartography; medical botany and plantation agriculture; biogeography and evolutionary biology; ecology and environmentalism; and race science and anthropology. The course primarily focuses on British and French colonial contexts in South Asia, Africa, Australasia and the Americas, but also considers Iberian, Russian, Dutch, and other imperial formations.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS211H1: Scientific Revolutions II
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures)
Mondays 12-2
Delivery Method: TBA
Case studies in the history of science from 1800 to 2000, including Volta, Lyell, Darwin, Mendel, Einstein, Schrödinger, Watson, and Crick. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.
Exclusion: HPS200Y1, HPS300Y0
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS222H1: Science, Paradoxes, and Knowledge
Course instructor: Joseph Berkovitz (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 2-4
Delivery Method: TBA
The course will focus on the bearings that philosophical views had on science in different periods in history. We shallconsider philosophical conceptions of space, time, and matter in Ancient Greece, the Early Modern Period and the 20thcentury; the influence of religious views on science in the 17th and 18th centuries; the analysis of scientific knowledge inthe 17th  and 18th centuries; and 20th century views of the nature of science and its history.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS240H1: The Influence of the Eugenics Movement on Contemporary Society
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 4-6
Delivery Method: TBA
This course explores present-day topics such as reproductive issues (including “designer babies” and genetic counselling), gender, racism/colonialism, disability and euthanasia through the lens of the history of eugenics.  A “scientific” movement which became popular around the world in the early twentieth century, eugenics was based on the principle that certain undesirable human characteristics were hereditary and could be eliminated by controlled reproduction.  It resulted in the enactment of laws in numerous places, including Canada, authorizing coerced reproductive sterilization of certain individuals, and other measures intended to “improve” humanity. Today, we see its influences woven through contemporary debates, a number of which we will consider.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS250H1: Introductory Philosophy of Science
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 2-4
Delivery Method: TBA
This course introduces and explores central issues in the philosophy of science, including scientific inference and method, and explanation. Topics may include underdetermination, realism, and empiricism, and laws of nature.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS270H1: Science and Literature
Course instructor: Yiftach Fehige (24 Lectures)
Thursdays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
This course will focus on the interplay between science and literature from ancient Greece to the present day. We will examine the impact of major scientific paradigm shifts on the literature of their time, and situate literary texts within the context of contemporary scientific discoveries and technological innovations.
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS283H1: The Engineer in History  (Engineering Course)
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Fridays 12-2
Delivery Method: TBA
The emphasis in this course will be more on the history of engineers as workers, members of professional groups, and managers rather than engineering proper, although obviously engineering cannot be ignored when we talk about engineers’ work.  The aim of the course is to give an understanding of the heritage of engineers as participants in the economy and society.

HPS301H1: Topics in the History of Science: A Global History of Mapping Sciences
Course instructor: Adrien Zakar (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Fridays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
Maps are pervasive in our world: so indispensable, and so disposable that thousands are made, used, and discarded every day. Yet not long ago, maps were both rare and strange technological things. When and why did modern maps and mapping systems come into being? Behind this transformation lie contentious stories of objects and people, makers and users, global forces and local dynamics, metropoles and colonies, technologies and cultures, and the modes of interaction that brought them together. Focusing on the period from the early 1800s to the present, this course introduces students to a broad range of research in the fields of science and technology studies, cartography, and history. Each week will illuminate maps and their importance in our world by focusing on a keyword, such as power, territory, worldmaking, imperialism, capitalism, and countermapping.
Prerequisites: A minimum of 4.0 course credit or instructor’s approval
Recommended Preparation:
 A prior course in HPS, History, or NMC
Distribution Requirement Status:
 Humanities
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

HPS318H1: History of Medicine I
Course instructor: Lucia Dacome (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays 12-2
Delivery Method: TBA
This course explores how medicine was practiced, taught and theorized from ancient Greece to the early modern period. It focuses on the historical development of medicine in relation to societies, politics and culture, and considers topics such as the creation of medical traditions, the tranmission and communication of medical knowledge, the pluralistic world of healers, the role of religion, magic and natural philosophy, the cultural meaning of disease, and the emergence of institutions such as the hospital.
Prerequisite: First year students must have instructors approval
Exclusion: HPS314Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS324H1: Natural Science & Social Issues
Course instructor: Yiftach Fehige (24 Lectures)
Tuesdays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
Historical examination of the interactions of science (both as body of knowledge and as enterprise) with ideological, political and social issues. The impact of science; attacks on and critiques of scientific expertise as background to contemporary conflicts. Subjects may vary according to students’ interests.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS351H1: Life Sciences and Society
Course instructor: Elise Burton (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Tuesdays & Thursdays 11-12
Delivery Method: TBA
This course examines how the contemporary life sciences intersect with global geopolitics through an introduction to the field of science and technology studies (STS). Using interdisciplinary methodologies and global perspectives, the course addresses key questions including: Who benefits from the development of new biotechnologies, and who is exploited in the process? Who sets the international norms of bioethics and medical market regulation? How are biologists and medical practitioners redefining life for different societies and their diverse constituencies? The course predominantly focuses on humans, but also introduces new scholarship on animal studies and synthetic life forms. Ithas significant coverage of the Middle East, Africa, and East and South Asia.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JHE353H1 History of Evolutionary Biology
Course instructor: TBA (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Thursdays 1-3
Delivery Method: TBA
An examination of major ideas about biological evolution from the 18th century to the 1930’s and of their impact on scientific and social thought. Topics include the diversity of life and its classification, the adaptation of organisms to their environment, Wallace’s and Darwin’s views on evolution by natural selection, sexual selection, inheritance from Mendel to T.H. Morgan, eugenics, and the implications of evolution for religion, gender roles, and the organization of society.
Prerequisite: 6 full courses or equivalent
Exclusions: EEB353H1, HPS323H1, HPS353H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities and Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS356H1: Child Science: Knowing and Caring for Children in Modern World
Course instructor: Wen-Ching Sung (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials) (New Course)
Mondays 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
‘Childhood’ has had diverse meanings throughout human history. In a western industrial society, responsibility for childcare has mainly fallen upon parents’ shoulders, with help from various professionals. Also, studies to improve knowledge and care for children have evolved into distinct fields across the life sciences, humanities, and social sciences. The child sciences, which include education, developmental psychology, and child and adolescent psychiatry, shape our views of children and influence parenting practices. In this course, we will examine how these sciences have penetrated families and schools to structure the daily life of children in the modern world.
Prerequisite: a minimum of 4.0 FCE’s or instructor’s approval
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a humanities and social science course
Depth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS370H1: Philosophy of Medicine
Course instructor: Brian Baigrie (24 Lectures, 10 Tutorials)
Mondays 12-2
Delivery Method: TBA
This course introduces students to philosophical issues in the study of medicine. The course will cover foundational questions, such as what constitutes evidence that a therapy is effective, how do we define health and disease, and information derived from research is used to support clinical practice. Students will be introduced to different movements in contemporary clinical medicine, such as Evidence-based Medicine, Person-Centered Healthcare, and Precision Medicine.
Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 FCE
Recommended preparation: HPS250H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS/MAT391H1: Rebels who Count: The History of Mathematics from 1700 to the present
Course instructor: TBA (36 Lectures)
Thursday 10-1
Delivery Method: TBA
A survey of the development of mathematics from 1700 to the present with emphasis on historical issues.
Prerequisite: At least one full course equivalent at the 200+level from CSC/MAT/STA
Exclusion: HPS310Y1; MAT220Y1, MAT391H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS402H1: Beyond the Human: Animals in the Histories of Science and Technology
Course instructor: Rebecca Woods (24 Seminars)
Thursday 2-4
Delivery Method: TBA
Nonhuman animals are central to the production of scientific facts and artifacts. They also exhibit little innate respect for anthropogenic political boundaries, making their study an effective way into transnational histories of science and technology. This advanced seminar will revisit classic themes in the history of science and technology—the rise of the laboratory; the development of natural history; experimental systems; categories of race, gender, and sex—from the perspective of nonhuman animals. Doing so will allow us to examine what technoscientific practice looks like when mice, monkeys, and Drosophila flies take center stage; and to bring nonwestern species, knowledges, practices, and places into existing narratives about the history of science and technology in the “West.”
Prerequisite: At least one full course equivalent at the 200+level from CSC/MAT/STA
Exclusion: HPS310Y1; MAT220Y1, MAT391H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS413H1: Reading and Writing about Physics
Course instructor: Chen-Pang Yeang (24 Seminars) (New Course)
Monday 10-12
Delivery Method: TBA
Historians, philosophers, and sociologists have produced a wealth of literature on the analysis and examination of physics from the early modern period to the present. In this seminar, we read and discuss in depth a collection of recent classics and cutting-edge works on the historical studies of physics. Students also conduct research based on this literature. We aim to use physics as a lens to understanding key themes in the making of modern science, from incommensurability, epistemic cultures, and historical ontology, to materiality, social construction, pedagogy, and countercultures.
Prerequisite: At least one HPS course
Recommended preparation: Develop the ability to read scholarly books and conduct research in history of science
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS444H1: Health, Medicine, and Society in the Mediterranean World
Course instructor: Lucia Dacome (24 Seminars) (New Course)
Tuesday 4-6
Delivery Method: TBA
This course examines healing practices and medical knowledge in the Mediterranean world, focusing on the early modern period. We will address topics such as the interplay between medicine and religion, the relationship between patients and practitioners, and the role of women as both healers and patients and across Mediterranean shores. We will also consider how individuals in different Mediterranean regions experienced the relationship between health and the environment, explore the bearings that medical pursuits had on the creation and consolidation of notions of sex and gender, and examine how medical knowledge shaped views of the body and informed health policies.
Prerequisites: A minimum of 8.0 credits or the instructor’s approval
Recommended preparation: This course presupposes having some background in the history of medicine and/or history of science and having engaged in historical research projects. It is highly recommended that students have taken one or more courses in History of Medicine (or History of Science and/or Technology). Ideally, students will have taken HPS318H or HPS319H, or at least one-half course in HPS or HIS with a focus on the history of science at the 200-level or higher.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)